THEY'RE EVERYWHERE

I was sitting in the studio last week, when I looked over to my right, and much to my surprise there was a great big brown spider on the wall next to my headphones in the studio. Shocked, I let out a blood curdling scream.

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LITTLE MISS MUFFETT

I have nothing against spiders, and actually, I normally will try to capture them and set them free outside instead of killing them, but this time, my Co Host had to save me so the spider met its' demise.

This time of year you always see more spiders. I just thought that they are looking for a place to stay because it's getting cold at night. However, I recently found out by reading an article in USA TODAY that this is NOT the general reason you see more spiders right now, like the one making a gigantic web on on front porch over my flowers. (I've almost walked into its web about 3 times, but it's web is so pretty, I'm walking around it for now. Go figure).

WHAT THE RESEARCHERS ARE SAYING

Researchers say the reason you see a spider running across your bathroom floor, or on your wall or outside your door is because this time of year they are look for partners. Mating season is in the fall so we are just getting started. The males leave their webs looking for female, so I guess the spider running across my floor this morning must have been looking for the hot chick on my front step over my flowers.

If you're like me, I'm thinking those little buggers are hungry, and if they are running through my house, they are going to eat some other kind of bug along the way. So if you're thinking the worlds' coming to an end because there are so many spiders...they really aren't gaining in population, they're just having their yearly Marti Gras.

 

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