With high temp in St. Cloud reaching 96° Friday, 96° Saturday, and 92° yesterday -- this early season heatwave is expected to continue into next week across our region.

Friday's 96° set a new daily record high. The old record of 95° for June 4th was set 121 years ago in 1900.

Regardless of what the National Weather Service recorded as the official high temperatures, thermometers showed triple digits all across the region Friday and Saturday afternoon.

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Officially it's still spring, although most of us consider Memorial Day the unofficial start to summer. Summer 'officially' begins in Minnesota at 10:32 pm on Sunday, June 20th. (Don't forget dad, that's also Father's Day.).

The average high temperature for June 7th in Saint Cloud is 78. Last Sunday (5/30) the high was 68 in Saint Cloud.

The Twin Cities office of the National Weather Service adds:

Prolonged stretch of hot weather with highs in the 90s, with lows near 70 will continue through the middle of next week. Looking ahead, above normal temperatures are favored through mid-June.

National Weather Service

 

High Temps for Today

  • St. Cloud:  93°
  • Little Falls:  92°
  • Princeton:  94°

High Temps for Tuesday

  • St. Cloud:  93°
  • Little Falls:  92°
  • Princeton:  94°

High Temps for Wednesday

  • St. Cloud:  94°
  • Little Falls:  94°
  • Princeton:  95°

High Temps for Thursday

  • St. Cloud:  95°
  • Little Falls:  94°
  • Princeton:  96°

High Temps for Friday

  • St. Cloud:  90°
  • Little Falls:  86°
  • Princeton:  92°

High Temps for Saturday

  • St. Cloud:  87°
  • Little Falls:  86°
  • Princeton:  87°

High Temps for Sunday

  • St. Cloud:  87°
  • Little Falls:  86°
  • Princeton:  87°
National Weather Service

Extreme heat is the leading cause of weather related deaths in the United States.

In late May NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) released their summer 2021 outlook, calling for a hotter than normal season for Minnesota. So far, it's looking like they're right on the money.

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